Ludwig Museum

Address
Komor Marcell u. 1
+36 1 555 3444

Links
Website

About
The collection is especially rich in works by American Pop-Art artists, and by German, French and North American artists active in the 1980s. It also surveys Hungarian art in the 1990s. (from budapestinfo.hu)

The art collector couple, Peter and Irene Ludwig provided contemporary art collections that provide an overview of the past 50 years of universal art and contemporary Hungarian art. (planetware.com)

The entire collection here has been recently acquired: It was a donation from Peter Ludwig (hence the name) in 1989. Once again, the setting of the museum is spectacular, situated as it is in one of the wings of the Castle. There are some big names on display although much of the work here is rather uninspired (Picasso’s Matador and Nude is here, but it is a work that has attracted much derision). There is also a section devoted to Pop Art and a new collection of modern Hungarian work. Admission is HUF 300. Many people adore this museum and return again and again. (From mytravelguide.com)

Comments
Right before I visited the museum I was caught in a real torrential downpour. The sky just opened up. That, coupled with hunger and a mass of confusion when changing trains (it really is easy, just not the first time, maybe just for me) didn’t set a great tone for the visit. Of course, it didn’t help that the attendant at the cafe looked past me and served two other people (who did speak Hungarian, but arrived after me) first. It also didn’t help that when I was buying my ticket and attempting to decide which exhibitions to visit, the clerk let out a huge sigh (I could understand if anyone was in line or he was hurried. This was not the case. I was the only customer for four clerks). Ok, Ok, enough preface.

The museum is located just south of city center on the 2/24 tram line. It is an impressive building sitting on the banks of the Danube and housing both the museum and National Theatre. The ground floor contains the cafe, coat check, lockers and ticket offices. Floor one and two house special exhibitions (Robert Capa and Things are Drawing to a Crisis as of today) and the third floor focuses on their permanent collection, a blend of contemporary art and popular Hungarian artists). The woman and artist that arranged my residency while in Hungary has two works in the collection which are exhibited. The collection is large and extensive for one family and certainly worthy of display.

A note on admission: I went to see one special exhibition and the permanent collection and it cost HUF 1000 or roughly $5 as of today.